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  • #16
    I think they look really good, but I have been reading online that the original plastic should be seen after you prime
    For White Primer, the grey plastic colour should still shimmer through as otherwise it would be too thick

    Your mini with the black primer is fine (but I would still recommend to add white primer on top of the black one)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by kodos View Post

      For White Primer, the grey plastic colour should still shimmer through as otherwise it would be too thick

      Your mini with the black primer is fine (but I would still recommend to add white primer on top of the black one)
      Thanks for the reply.

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      • #18
        I am done with the priming process (mostly) and ready to start painting. But I have some questions

        1) I know I have to thin my paints, what is the ratio water: paint, 1:1, 1:2, 2:1?
        2) Should I paint 1 miniature at a time, or paint all faces, then all helmets, etc? I feel like I will run out of paint if I do 1 mini at a time.
        3) I have only primed my miniatures (black). The steps to follow are pplying the paint, washes, and then dry brushing, correct?
        4) I believe I will eventually varnish my miniatures, how long do I have to do it between the time I finish painting them and I varnish them?
        5) What way does the brush go? People have told me to paint from inside out, are both horizontal and vertical movements okey?
        6) How to paint shields with certain format like the ones in the picture below? I noticed the minis do not have a line that delineates where each color should end.
        3462.1.1000.1000.FFFFFF.0.jpg

        Extra questions:
        7) I am pretty sure there are multiple ways to design shields, like a line in the middle, two crosses, etc. Any webpage you could provide for ideas would be appreciated, the best I could think was google images.
        8)I was originally going to replicate the Mantic color scheme for dwarfs but then I decided I would go with my own imagination. For people who have experience painting, does this sound like a good combination? Gold for some details, brown for leather parts, silver for all iron armor and weapons, and green for clothes. The green I was thinking would be something in between khaki and green, like when the plants start to dry out. I imagine my army trying to match a landscape like the one below.
        mountains-480471_960_720.jpg

        Thanks for taking the time to help me out!
        Last edited by Dwarfy; 18-01-2018, 05:33 AM.

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        • #19
          Congrats on the priming! Looks / sounds like it went well

          Not a painting expert or a super painter, but I'll give some of those a shot:
          Originally posted by Dwarfy View Post
          1) I know I have to thin my paints, what is the ratio water: paint, 1:1, 1:2, 2:1?
          2) Should I paint 1 miniature at a time, or paint all faces, then all helmets, etc? I feel like I will run out of paint if I do 1 mini at a time.
          3) I have only primed my miniatures (black). The steps to follow are pplying the paint, washes, and then dry brushing, correct?
          4) I believe I will eventually varnish my miniatures, how long do I have to do it between the time I finish painting them and I varnish them?
          5) What way does the brush go? People have told me to paint from inside out, are both horizontal and vertical movements okey?
          1. "Milk consistency" is the answer that worked best for me. There was an ancient pic somebody made on Dakka showing what that looks like inside a pot (I paint directly from the paint pot because I'm a barbarian / have never used a dropper paint that wasn't a wash), but I haven't found it yet ... I couldn't give an actual ratio, and I have a feeling it's much less water than those you posted. I dilute my pots by dripping water off my finger into the pot, closing and shaking vigorously, then repeating as needed until it's thin enough. I'm not sure how to dilute dropper paints (just bought some Vallejo so will have to find out). There is, of course, a thing as too diluted, and arguably some paints you want to be thicker (Citadel foundation / base paints). What kind of paint did you end up going with?

          2) For a very, very long time I painted one mini at a time, because I needed to feel that buzz of completion to keep myself engaged (I *really* didn't like painting my minis for the first 10 years of doing this :P). But once I had other drivers to paint (i.e. organized events like tournaments, now a rule to only play with painted), and less time, I started to batch paint. At this point batches of three feel good to me to maintain a balance of efficiency, detail and progress. If I ever did another horde army I'd consider doing bigger batches, but I'm not sure I've got that in me. Though now that I've got an airbrush ... Painting one mini at a time doesn't necessarily cost more paint, though your paints will maybe dry out more and need to be refreshed between minis. But it does cost time :/

          3) I guess my rough process is: prime, tidy up prime, base coat, wash, wait for it to dry totally, highlight / drybrush with base color, highlight / dry brush with highlight color (lightened shade of the base color or a high contrast color), smallest details (eyes, teeth, nails, etc). I don't glaze or blend or do many layers of highlighting. Multiple washes or stages of washing is probably as advanced as I've gotten.

          4) Varnishing is an important step, and one I feel like people struggle with until they find something that works for them. My Chaos Space Marine and Skaven armies - which have seen alot of play over the years - I first sealed with Krylon Acrylic Crystal Clear (i.e. a gloss varnish) and then Testors Dull Cote / Spray Lacquer (i.e. a matte varnish). Theory being that gloss varnish is stronger, so protects the mini, but matte varnish cuts the shine from the gloss and makes it look better. I actually *really* love Testors Spray Lacquer, it does some magic something by getting into the cracks and bumping the color up somehow (though it will cut the sheen on your metals, if that's something you care about. I remember my Ork-playing brother being so sad his shiny shootas were all dull now). Word is the formula may have been changed recently, buuuuut I'm still holding out hope it's awesome. At this point I only use Testors, but I really ought to keep doing the two-step deal, as I'm getting a lot of chipping on stuff.

          5) Inside -> out sounds good. I'd also note that you'll learn what parts of a mini to paint first because you can be messy and clean the mess up by painting the next section. That was a big lesson in painting faster for me, previously I was really worried about staying inside the lines at all times. As for brush direction, most brushes are omni-directional (because round), so should work out! Though clearly some brushes are less so (like big flat brushes being used for drybrushing).
          BLOODFIRE :: Salamander Battle Reports
          NURGLEKIN :: Ratkin Battle Reports
          INSTAGRAM :: boss_salvage

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          • #20
            Thanks for the detailed response Boss Savage! The only answer that I would ask for some more clarification is N4. Do I have 1 day, a week, a month, a year? What is the longest I can wait before signs of broken paint appear?

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            • #21
              I'd suggest sealing before you play with them or pack them away, as use is what causes chipping. Acrylic paint will fade in light, but I don't think it chips or falls off by itself (not counting unwashed resin horror stories where paintjobs just peel off).
              BLOODFIRE :: Salamander Battle Reports
              NURGLEKIN :: Ratkin Battle Reports
              INSTAGRAM :: boss_salvage

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