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  • What tools do I need?

    Hello, I just got into the miniature hobby and I am confused as to what tools I might need. So while I wait for my miniatures to arrive, I thought it would be a good idea to buy the tools and products I might eventually need.

    Here is a list of what I believe I might need. Please correct me if somethings seems unnecessary or something is missing.
    • Painting Mat
    • Water Pot
    • Paint
    • Black Base Primer
    • Glue
    • Brushes
    • Mouldline Remover
    • Fine detail Cutter
    • Palette

    Now I am confused when I consider brands. I have looked into Games workshop Citadel tools as they are one company who has been around for a long time, but I do not know if the quality they provide is justified by their prices. I guess my question lays in: Does any of you recommend a specific brand for any of the tools I might need, or are some things like base primer and glue universal, and I should buy whichever is the cheapest?

    I would also appreciate brush recommendations (and any other tool really), there are so many types, sizes and brands I do not know which one I should go with.

    Thanks for the help!
    Last edited by Dwarfy; 05-01-2018, 04:52 AM.

  • #2
    Don't look at GW tools, you can get better quality for less money if you visit your local tool store (DIY market or what ever those are called there, GW just sell those standard tools for an increased price)

    First of all, get a black and a white primer (I prefer Army Painter, but GW is fine too), lay a base coat of black and than spots of white (from one direction like top to bottom), this makes it easier to spot details during painting and gives colours a better grip (look something like the unpainted model in the middle http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nl7rxaOLW-...00/Oger+01.JPG)

    You would need plastic and super glue (use whatever you like, Revell for plastic and Loctite for super glue is what I ended up after several years of trying different brands)

    a cutter with exchangeable knives, fine (hand) driller, a clipper, and fine (key) feiles (different shapes)
    maybe also some 0,8mm copper wire to pin larger models parts (like arms of metal or resin monsters) or fix them on bases
    I also suggest using a wet-palette (DIY, something like this https://creativetwilight.com/diy-wet-palette/ )

    For paints and brushes, go to the local art supply to get something to test. All Acrylic Paints work and are mixable with each other, different brands have different advantages, and in the end you take different brands for different kind of techniques (like I prefer Marabu for drybrush, HobbyLine for "standard" and Army Painter washes, others prefer P3 or Vallejo because of the huge colour rang and no mixing is needed, while I have my 10 base colours and mix everything else) and it needs to just test them to get your personal preferences.

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    • #3
      Anything with a GW logo is going to be expensive. I like their paints (Seraphim Sepia) and their brushes are decent. But you can find cheaper brands that will work just as well.

      I'm currently putting together a regiment of Bulwarkers and you absolutely NEED the 2 tools below. Mantic models look good and are a great price but the models don't always fit together perfectly. I file them down a bit to get the fit tighter.
      1. Hobby cutters (I got mine from Lowes)
      2. Hobby File (I got a collection of 5 files from Lowes for >$10)

      There is a tutorial on tools in the Hot Lead dvd I mentioned in your other thread.

      Comment


      • #4
        Green Stuff World is an online seller in Spain that makes some very cool sculpting tools in house, but also has sourced a [i]lot[/t] of hobby quality tools and materials and made them available for what are really quite solid prices. The only downside is having to wait a little bit (because Europe), however we're not talking 1 month Polish shipping here (like 1-2 weeks), and even then shipping is cheap too. I've ordered alot of sculpting stuff from them - and an airbrush recently to try out their brand - but would be confident getting all my hobby tools from them, if I were starting out. They've got some great videos on simple techniques too. Here's a link to their generic tools section: http://www.greenstuffworld.com/en/12-amazing-tools

        I don't think there's anything you need from GW, with the exception of their paints should you want to give them a shot, and all their hobby supplies are absolutely overcosted for what they are. This isn't me being anti-GW or something, it's just very, very easy to get the same tools for much cheaper, locally or online.

        When it comes to paint, I have tons of Citadel because I grew up in the hobby with GW, so I tend to be attached to a few shades (and have armies that depend on certain Citadel colors), however these days I buy P3 (Privateer Press's line) + ArmyPainter washes. P3 because it's decent and a better value (more paint, less price) and it airbrushes ok, AP because they're the best washes, at least for me. I've recently picked up a few Vallejo paints that aren't really available in P3 or Citadel's lines, but I'm not a Vallejo fanboy just yet.

        EDIT

        Since you asked, the core of my hobby tools:
        - Hobby Knife (standard blades + saw blades)
        - Hobby Clippers ("Flush Side Cutting Pliers" on GSW)
        - Needle File Set (at least 1 flat, 1 round, 1 triangle)
        - Hand Drill (+ rod to pin with)
        - Tweezers (sharp metal ones)
        - Glue (I use Medium to Thick Cyanoacrylate (super glue) for everything)
        - Green Stuff (Kneadatite is a brand name)

        I think that covers construction for me? Paint's another thing, which I'm happy letting better painters talk about
        Last edited by Boss Salvage; 05-01-2018, 07:43 PM.
        BLOODFIRE :: Salamander Battle Reports
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        • #5
          Thanks for all the replies!

          Comment


          • #6
            So, I dont think this is the place to ask, but I do not want to open a new thread for each silly question I have. I have started assembling my units but there is one I do not have no idea whatsoever what to do with.
            It is the unit in the top right corner. It is a hollow dwarf with no back, and I cant figure it out its purpose. The only thing I can think of is to put him laying down and pretend he died, but that doesnt sound right. Hope you can give me a hand.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Yes it is a dead dwarf
              can be used as a unit filler, or on it's own as wound marker (on a larger base together with a hole for a dice)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by kodos View Post
                Yes it is a dead dwarf
                can be used as a unit filler, or on it's own as wound marker (on a larger base together with a hole for a dice)
                Thanks a lot! On closer inspection I noticed it did not have a base unlike other units. I also sought it could be a drunken dwarf not fit for battle

                Comment


                • #9
                  Okey, so I am moving on to using my black primer and I have a "few" questions:
                  1) Do I need to wear gloves?
                  2) Do you have to paint each figure individually, or can they be sprayed at the same time?
                  3) Do you apply the primer to the base?
                  4) About what distance do you apply the primer, and for how many seconds?
                  5)How many coats of primer you do?
                  6)Once the miniature primer is applied, how long does it take to dry?
                  7) Once the primer have dried, do I have to paint the miniatures in a matter of days, or could I wait a long time before starting the painting process?
                  8) What should I use to protect surfaces and prevent the primer from staining walls/tables?

                  PD: Should I start 1 thread for each unrelated question I have in the future, or keep posting here? Don't want to clog the forums.
                  Last edited by Dwarfy; 11-01-2018, 09:26 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Sure, I can share my experience from a bunch of years of priming minis with spray paint. For starters, I should point out I use Krylon Flat Black, due to price (like $3 at Deathmart) and consistency. I started out with Citadel, which felt expensive when it was only $10 a can, and it was on the whole good; tried Armory (pretty bad, dunno if still around); moved to spray paints and tried Rustoleum (terrible, lost a chaos army to fuzzy primer), before hitting Krylon and falling in love. At this point there are plenty of gaming primers available - ArmyPainter looks nice and I like their other paints - but all cost too much for me to want to deviate from my trusted, if finicky, brand of choice.
                    Originally posted by Dwarfy View Post
                    1) Do I need to wear gloves?
                    2) Do you have to paint each figure individually, or can they be sprayed at the same time?
                    3) Do you apply the primer to the base?
                    4) About what distance do you apply the primer, and for how many seconds?
                    5)How many coats of primer you do?
                    6)Once the miniature primer is applied, how long does it take to dry?
                    7) Once the primer have dried, do I have to paint the miniatures in a matter of days, or could I wait a long time before starting the painting process?
                    8) What should I use to protect surfaces and prevent the primer from staining walls/tables?
                    1. Up to you, but you're likely not spraying into your hand, so should just be back spatter type speckling. The paint won't hurt your skin, if that's what you're asking. You should consider wearing a dust mask tho, especially if you're doing a lot of priming at once, or spraying inside.
                    2. I spray in batches, and I don't think there's an upper limit. If doing a large batch you'll just want to keep shaking the can between passes / minis. So you don't need to loving spray one mini at a time; in fact because you want coats you'll probably want multiple things to spray.
                    3. If you're gluing down sand or other lose ballast to your bases, yes you should prime the bases too. Actually most basing you'll want to prime before you paint, like all things you paint. There are some crackle paints and whatnot that you'll paint after the minis, but getting primer down on the base is a good call there too. And if you're asking about should the model be glued to the base before you prime / paint it, I find in KOW multibasing is much easier to paint the bases and the minis separate and combine them afterwards, so the minis tend to go on temporary bases or corks or something.
                    4. 8-10" I'd say, and you want to hit the mini(s) with a pass of paint, going from one direction to another across the target. You should start and stop the spray off the mini, so any spatter happens to either side.
                    5. ^ Which means you end up doing kind of light coats, to avoid clogging details with a single heavy spray. You'll probably do 2+ coats for any model, which includes turning the model onto its side or upside down to get hard to reach areas. At some point you'll want to call your coverage good and clean up missed areas with a black paint when dry - it's not worth wrecking easily reached areas of a mini to try to reach nooks and crannies with primer.
                    6. Krylon is 'dry to touch' in 10 minutes but you'll want it to de-gas for an hour or so most likely. Not a hard rule, and you could probably get to work in 20 minutes or less, however relative humidity is that day. Though there will be a smell due to de-gassing continuing.
                    7. Naw, you have forever. The base coat might get dusty if it sits around for years (this happens :P), at which point you can dust with a brush or canned air and it's exactly the same black primed mini.
                    8. So, you should spray outside, or in a well-ventilated area (fume hood / open garage), so now we're talking about how much overspray you can accept. You'll most likely be spraying your minis on a chunk of cardboard or a box or into a box or something, which will catch most of the overspray, or if you don't care much, straight onto your driveway or whatever. Spraying inside isn't a thing you really want to do, because mess and fumes, but can be done in a pinch if you've got a dry basement you don't care about :P

                    At this point we should probably talk about humidity? Krylon, and many cheap spray paints, want as low a humidity as you can get, which for me typically means Spring and Fall are good times to spray in Upstate NY, and Summer is pretty much a no-go. Winter can be pretty nice too, as the humidity isn't so bad either and the cold doesn't effect the spray if you keep the can warm by bringing it inside between coats. (Cold spray paint is bad.) Expensive modeling primers are similar, just more or less forgiving. Wind can also be a factor in making spraying hard.
                    Last edited by Boss Salvage; 11-01-2018, 09:56 PM.
                    BLOODFIRE :: Salamander Battle Reports
                    NURGLEKIN :: Ratkin Battle Reports
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Boss Salvage View Post
                      Sure, I can share my experience from a bunch of years of priming minis with spray paint. For starters, I should point out I use Krylon Flat Black, due to price (like $3 at Deathmart) and consistency. I started out with Citadel, which felt expensive when it was only $10 a can, and it was on the whole good; tried Armory (pretty bad, dunno if still around); moved to spray paints and tried Rustoleum (terrible, lost a chaos army to fuzzy primer), before hitting Krylon and falling in love. At this point there are plenty of gaming primers available - ArmyPainter looks nice and I like their other paints - but all cost too much for me to want to deviate from my trusted, if finicky, brand of choice.
                      1. Up to you, but you're likely not spraying into your hand, so should just be back spatter type speckling. The paint won't hurt your skin, if that's what you're asking. You should consider wearing a dust mask tho, especially if you're doing a lot of priming at once, or spraying inside.
                      2. I spray in batches, and I don't think there's an upper limit. If doing a large batch you'll just want to keep shaking the can between passes / minis. So you don't need to loving spray one mini at a time; in fact because you want coats you'll probably want multiple things to spray.
                      3. If you're gluing down sand or other lose ballast to your bases, yes you should prime the bases too. Actually most basing you'll want to prime before you paint, like all things you paint. There are some crackle paints and whatnot that you'll paint after the minis, but getting primer down on the base is a good call there too. And if you're asking about should the model be glued to the base before you prime / paint it, I find in KOW multibasing is much easier to paint the bases and the minis separate and combine them afterwards, so the minis tend to go on temporary bases or corks or something.
                      4. 8-10" I'd say, and you want to hit the mini(s) with a pass of paint, going from one direction to another across the target. You should start and stop the spray off the mini, so any spatter happens to either side.
                      5. ^ Which means you end up doing kind of light coats, to avoid clogging details with a single heavy spray. You'll probably do 2+ coats for any model, which includes turning the model onto its side or upside down to get hard to reach areas. At some point you'll want to call your coverage good and clean up missed areas with a black paint when dry - it's not worth wrecking easily reached areas of a mini to try to reach nooks and crannies with primer.
                      6. Krylon is 'dry to touch' in 10 minutes but you'll want it to de-gas for an hour or so most likely. Not a hard rule, and you could probably get to work in 20 minutes or less, however relative humidity is that day. Though there will be a smell due to de-gassing continuing.
                      7. Naw, you have forever. The base coat might get dusty if it sits around for years (this happens :P), at which point you can dust with a brush or canned air and it's exactly the same black primed mini.
                      8. So, you should spray outside, or in a well-ventilated area (fume hood / open garage), so now we're talking about how much overspray you can accept. You'll most likely be spraying your minis on a chunk of cardboard or a box or into a box or something, which will catch most of the overspray, or if you don't care much, straight onto your driveway or whatever. Spraying inside isn't a thing you really want to do, because mess and fumes, but can be done in a pinch if you've got a dry basement you don't care about :P

                      At this point we should probably talk about humidity? Krylon, and many cheap spray paints, want as low a humidity as you can get, which for me typically means Spring and Fall are good times to spray in Upstate NY, and Summer is pretty much a no-go. Winter can be pretty nice too, as the humidity isn't so bad either and the cold doesn't effect the spray if you keep the can warm by bringing it inside between coats. (Cold spray paint is bad.) Expensive modeling primers are similar, just more or less forgiving. Wind can also be a factor in making spraying hard.
                      Thanks for the extremely detailed response!

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                      • #12
                        No problem, hope it helps. Another thing I thought of last night is to spray a test model first, especially if you're about to do a whole bunch of minis. You don't need to wait for it to fully dry (so like <10 min is fine) but that way you'll have an idea of what the humidity / primer is doing so you don't wreck all those minis you care about. Spray paint can be finicky but you'll get a feel for when it's go time.
                        BLOODFIRE :: Salamander Battle Reports
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                        INSTAGRAM :: boss_salvage

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                        • #13
                          So, I undercoated them and they look good. Might have to give a second coat to the first miniatures I did as they may be undercoated (was nervous and barely sprayed them). Is a second coat a must? I think the majority look pretty decent by now (its been about 6 hours since I finished them).

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                          • #14
                            Congrats! Coverage is up to you, but basically the more you cover with spray the less you'll need to touch up with acrylics. Because post-priming you'll likely need to go in and tidy up missed spots with black / white acrylic, which won't cover as well as the spray primer did, but is especially important with black, as part of the point of using black is to get the recesses nice and dark before you start putting down colors. (I actually find white spray primer is so finicky that I do a much finer coat than I do black, which works out because I also find I need less white basecoat on a model. With black, you're actually using the prime as a color in some cases; with white, you'll be covering everything up + washing it, so it really isn't showing through, but creating a base for paint to stick through and colors to be more vibrant against. At least that's how I've come to understand white priming (which is still a bit of a headtrip for me).)
                            BLOODFIRE :: Salamander Battle Reports
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                            INSTAGRAM :: boss_salvage

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the response. I would like to have an opinion on this minis I primed a few days ago. I think they look really good, but I have been reading online that the original plastic should be seen after you prime, and I do not think this is the case. Note that my camera and lighting are not of great quality, but I can still see the mini details even though I can not see the original plastic.
                              It is not like I can fix it, but I still have about 50 minis I have not primed and I could use some constructive criticism.
                              0117180056[1].jpg



                              0117180056a[1].jpg
                              0117180055[1].jpg
                              Last edited by Dwarfy; Today, 07:11 AM.

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